Category Archives: Format: Stereo 8

stereo 8 / 8 track tape

Bark at the Moon (8tracks, US)

Year 1983
Reissue Year
Origin US
Label CBS
Reference QZA 38987
Barcode
Tape color
Other Identifiers
Track List
  • A1 – Bark At The Moon
  • A2 – Centre Of Eternity
  • B1 – You’re No Different
  • B2 – Now You See It (Now You Don’t)
  • C1 – Slow Down
  • C2 – Waiting For Darkness
  • D1 – Rock ‘N’ Roll Rebel
  • D2 – So Tired
Line up
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Jake E. Lee – guitar
  • Bob Daisley – bass
  • Tommy Aldridge – drums
  • Don Airey – keyboards
Notes

Blizzard of Ozz (Stereo 8, US)

Year 1981
Origin US
Label JET
Reference JZA 36812
Matrix / Stencils N/A
OZZ Number N/A
Other Identifiers Barcode:7464-36812-8
Track List
  • 01 – I don’t Know – Crazy Train
  • 02 -Dee – Suicide Solution – Mr. Crowley
  • 03 No Bone Movies – Revelation (mother earth)
  • 04 – Goodbye to Romance – Steal away (the Night) – Crazy train (reprise)
Line up
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Randy Rhoads – guitar
  • Bob Daisley – bass
  • Lee Kerslake – drums
  • John Cook – keyboards
Notes
– Blue color cartridge
– Stereo 8, commonly known as the eight-track cartridge, eight-track tape, or eight-track, is a magnetic tape sound recording technology, popular from the mid-1960s to the early 1980s, primarily in the US (it was relatively unknown in many European countries). The Stereo 8 also introduced the problem of dividing up the programming intended for a two-sided LP record into four programs. Often this resulted in songs being split into two parts, song orders being reshuffled, shorter songs being repeated, and songs separated by long passages of silence. There are numerous reasons for the format’s decline. While the cassette offered features that the eight-track lacked, such as smaller size and rewinding capability, its tape speed was half that of Stereo 8, producing theoretically lower sound quality; however, constant development of the cassette turned it into a widespread high-fidelity medium. Another factor was the cost of blank tapes and recorders, where cassette systems tended to be cheaper. There was also a sustained effort by record companies to reduce the number of different formats offered in the late 1970s, and when sales of eight-tracks slipped, they were quick to abandon the format.

N.U.R.O.C.K. (Stereo 8, US, Compilation)

Year 1982
Origin USA
Label LOTUS RECORDS
Reference PTU 28??
Barcode 0 22775 02888 1
Other Identifiers
Track List
  • Side A
  • Program One
  • 01 – Joan Jett – I love rock n roll
  • 02 – Bryan Adams – Lonely Nights
  • 03 – Ozzy Osbourne – Flying High Again
  • Program Two
  • 01 – the Dregs – Crank it up
  • 02 – Rainbow – Stone Cold
  • 03 – Triumph – Magic Power
  • Program Three
  • 01 – 38 Special– Caugh up in you
  • 02 – John Cougar – Hurts so good
  • 03 – Loverboy – Working for the weekend
  • Program Four
  • 01 – Shooting Star – Hollywood
  • 02 – Krokus – Long Stick Goes Boom
  • 03 – Sammy Hagar – I’ Fall in love again
Line up
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Randy Rhoads – guitar
  • Bob Daisley – bass
  • Lee Kerslake – drums
  • Don Airey – keyboards
Notes

Diary of a Madman (Stereo 8, CA)

Year 1981
Origin Canada
Label CBS
Reference
Barcode
Other Identifiers
Track List
  • 01 – Over The Mountain – Diary Of A Madman
  • 02 – You Can’t Kill Rock And Roll – S.A.T.O
  • 03 – Believer – Little Dolls
  • 04 – Flying High Again – Tonight
Line up
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Randy Rhoads – guitar
  • Bob Daisley – bass
  • Lee Kerslake – drums
  • John Cook – keyboards
Notes
– Lavel Cover is red
– Stereo 8, commonly known as the eight-track cartridge, eight-track tape, or eight-track, is a magnetic tape sound recording technology, popular from the mid-1960s to the early 1980s, primarily in the US (it was relatively unknown in many European countries). The Stereo 8 also introduced the problem of dividing up the programming intended for a two-sided LP record into four programs. Often this resulted in songs being split into two parts, song orders being reshuffled, shorter songs being repeated, and songs separated by long passages of silence. There are numerous reasons for the format’s decline. While the cassette offered features that the eight-track lacked, such as smaller size and rewinding capability, its tape speed was half that of Stereo 8, producing theoretically lower sound quality; however, constant development of the cassette turned it into a widespread high-fidelity medium. Another factor was the cost of blank tapes and recorders, where cassette systems tended to be cheaper. There was also a sustained effort by record companies to reduce the number of different formats offered in the late 1970s, and when sales of eight-tracks slipped, they were quick to abandon the format.

Blizzard of Ozz (Stereo 8, CA)

Year 1981
Origin Canada
Label CBS
Reference
Barcode
Other Identifiers
Track List
  • 01 – I don’t Know – Crazy Train
  • 02 -Dee – Suicide Solution – Mr. Crowley
  • 03 No Bone Movies – Revelation (mother earth)
  • 04 – Goodbye to Romance – Steal away (the Night) – Crazy train (reprise)
Line up
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Randy Rhoads – guitar
  • Bob Daisley – bass
  • Lee Kerslake – drums
  • John Cook – keyboards
Notes
– Label cover printed on apricot cream color
– Stereo 8, commonly known as the eight-track cartridge, eight-track tape, or eight-track, is a magnetic tape sound recording technology, popular from the mid-1960s to the early 1980s, primarily in the US (it was relatively unknown in many European countries). The Stereo 8 also introduced the problem of dividing up the programming intended for a two-sided LP record into four programs. Often this resulted in songs being split into two parts, song orders being reshuffled, shorter songs being repeated, and songs separated by long passages of silence. There are numerous reasons for the format’s decline. While the cassette offered features that the eight-track lacked, such as smaller size and rewinding capability, its tape speed was half that of Stereo 8, producing theoretically lower sound quality; however, constant development of the cassette turned it into a widespread high-fidelity medium. Another factor was the cost of blank tapes and recorders, where cassette systems tended to be cheaper. There was also a sustained effort by record companies to reduce the number of different formats offered in the late 1970s, and when sales of eight-tracks slipped, they were quick to abandon the format.

Diario De Un Loco (Stereo 8, ARG )

Year 1981
Origin argentina
Label JET
Reference 581.134
OZZ Number N/A
Barcode
Other Identifiers
Track List
  • 01. Sobre La Montana
  • 02. Volando Alto Otra Vez
  • 03. Ne Puedes Matar Al Rock And Roll
  • 04. Creyente
  • 05. Munequitas
  • 06. Esta Noche
  • 07. S.A.T.O.
  • 08. Diario De Un Loco
Line up
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Randy Rhoads – guitar
  • Bob Daisley – bass
  • Lee Kerslake – drums
  • John Cook – keyboards
Notes
Stereo 8, commonly known as the eight-track cartridge, eight-track tape, or eight-track, is a magnetic tape sound recording technology, popular from the mid-1960s to the early 1980s, primarily in the US (it was relatively unknown in many European countries). The Stereo 8 also introduced the problem of dividing up the programming intended for a two-sided LP record into four programs. Often this resulted in songs being split into two parts, song orders being reshuffled, shorter songs being repeated, and songs separated by long passages of silence. There are numerous reasons for the format’s decline. While the cassette offered features that the eight-track lacked, such as smaller size and rewinding capability, its tape speed was half that of Stereo 8, producing theoretically lower sound quality; however, constant development of the cassette turned it into a widespread high-fidelity medium. Another factor was the cost of blank tapes and recorders, where cassette systems tended to be cheaper. There was also a sustained effort by record companies to reduce the number of different formats offered in the late 1970s, and when sales of eight-tracks slipped, they were quick to abandon the format.

Blizzard of Ozz (Stereo 8, US)

Year 1981
Origin US
Label JET
Reference JZA 36812
Matrix / Stencils N/A
OZZ Number N/A
Other Identifiers Barcode:7464-36812-8
Track List
  • 01 – I don’t Know – Crazy Train
  • 02 -Dee – Suicide Solution – Mr. Crowley
  • 03 No Bone Movies – Revelation (mother earth)
  • 04 – Goodbye to Romance – Steal away (the Night) – Crazy train (reprise)
Line up
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Randy Rhoads – guitar
  • Bob Daisley – bass
  • Lee Kerslake – drums
  • John Cook – keyboards
Notes
Stereo 8, commonly known as the eight-track cartridge, eight-track tape, or eight-track, is a magnetic tape sound recording technology, popular from the mid-1960s to the early 1980s, primarily in the US (it was relatively unknown in many European countries). The Stereo 8 also introduced the problem of dividing up the programming intended for a two-sided LP record into four programs. Often this resulted in songs being split into two parts, song orders being reshuffled, shorter songs being repeated, and songs separated by long passages of silence. There are numerous reasons for the format’s decline. While the cassette offered features that the eight-track lacked, such as smaller size and rewinding capability, its tape speed was half that of Stereo 8, producing theoretically lower sound quality; however, constant development of the cassette turned it into a widespread high-fidelity medium. Another factor was the cost of blank tapes and recorders, where cassette systems tended to be cheaper. There was also a sustained effort by record companies to reduce the number of different formats offered in the late 1970s, and when sales of eight-tracks slipped, they were quick to abandon the format.

Diary of a Madman (Stereo 8, US)

Year 1981
Origin US
Label JET
Reference FZA 37492
Barcode 0 7464-37492-8
Other Identifiers
Track List
  • 01 – Over The Mountain – Diary Of A Madman
  • 02 – You Can’t Kill Rock And Roll – S.A.T.O
  • 03 – Believer – Little Dolls
  • 04 – Flying High Again – Tonight
Line up
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Randy Rhoads – guitar
  • Bob Daisley – bass
  • Lee Kerslake – drums
  • John Cook – keyboards
Notes
Stereo 8, commonly known as the eight-track cartridge, eight-track tape, or eight-track, is a magnetic tape sound recording technology, popular from the mid-1960s to the early 1980s, primarily in the US (it was relatively unknown in many European countries). The Stereo 8 also introduced the problem of dividing up the programming intended for a two-sided LP record into four programs. Often this resulted in songs being split into two parts, song orders being reshuffled, shorter songs being repeated, and songs separated by long passages of silence. There are numerous reasons for the format’s decline. While the cassette offered features that the eight-track lacked, such as smaller size and rewinding capability, its tape speed was half that of Stereo 8, producing theoretically lower sound quality; however, constant development of the cassette turned it into a widespread high-fidelity medium. Another factor was the cost of blank tapes and recorders, where cassette systems tended to be cheaper. There was also a sustained effort by record companies to reduce the number of different formats offered in the late 1970s, and when sales of eight-tracks slipped, they were quick to abandon the format.